You know you're Cambodian when...

Archive/RSS/Ask/Submit

Hello all and welcome! :)
This blog is purposely for everything and anything Khmer related. If you'd like to share any stories, pictures, cambodian jokes, facts, WHATEVER! feel free to submit them here! I'll try to do as much as I can. Hope you all enjoy! :)

---SUBMIT HERE!--- GOT QUESTIONS? ---CASA Fanpage!---
free counters

Proverbs/Quotes | You know.. | Folktales

Follow @fckyeahcambodia

Visit my store on Storenvy

Posts tagged pol pot.

Today, January 7, 2013, marks the 34th anniversary of the fall of the Khmer Rouge in 1979. Today is a day to always remember. I can only imagine what the experience was like during those dark years, especially for my family, who were lucky enough to escape and survive the genocide.

This is a skit performed by Cambodian artists on CTN in honor of this day. I could not hold my tears back watching this.

submitted by: sareypheap

A Documentary by Dith Pran and featuring Dr. Haing S. Ngor and their stories told. (Part One)

Please watch, never forget the troubles and hardships that our families and ancestors have gone through. Always remember and keep in mind all of the stories. Remember our culture, don’t let it slip away.

And also, Rest in peace and bless both of these inspirational men <3

Dr. Haing S. Ngor winning best supporting Actor at the Oscars.

It’s very sad he had to leave so early and leave the way that he did. There are rumors of how and why his death occurred. He would have done and accomplished many great things if he was still here today. His role for the movie fit perfectly because it was basically “helping to tell a story the world” what happened to him and to everyone else during the Khmer Rouge. An inspiration for many, he was a truly remarkable human being.

Wishing you a better life in the next life and the life after that, Mr. Ngor. <3

Remember seeing a few documentaries that I have posted/reblogged? Well here he is himself, as the producer! lol His documentaries are about the genocide and history of Cambodia, and with this, any contribution(s) can help with both his personal project and necessary tools to continue his passion. :)

READ and FIND OUT MORE AT:

http://www.indiegogo.com/Remembering-Home

Phnom Penh by cosmo45 on Flickr.

No visit to Phnom Penh is complete without a visit to the Toul Sleng Genocide Museum - ‘almost inevitably a harrowing and heart-rending experience, but one which puts into context the suffering of the Cambodian people and country’, to quote the ‘Rough Guide to Cambodia’. Formerly a high school, these buildings became a notorious detention, interrogation and torture centre during the brutal reign of the Khmer Rouge (1975-79). It is estimated that as many as 20,000 people were held here before being taken away for execution in the Killing Fields. This photograph shows the prison regulations.”

Lost Love trailer
"Phnom Penh — Cambodia, 1975, was the year when Khmer Rouge came into power, beginning nearly 4 years of bloody rule over the Cambodians. During these dark years, the country was subject to the many new "revolutionary" policies of the "Angkar" (the common reference name of Khmer Rouge at that time). Women and children were sent to collective camps to work in farms and plantations for food they cannot eat; men were exhausted at labour camps and intellectuals or suspected persons with any "connections" that went against the revolutionary ideology were tortured and executed. Countless people of that generation were never seen again and families separated.
This is the true story of Nun Amara — the story her life during the genocide of Pol Pot’s regime. Now 68 years old, and Madam Amar does not enjoy the health as one would expect of her age, a legacy from the hardships she faced from 1975 - 1979. This film documented the sadness of her life, especially the loss of her family in the genocide.”  

We remember the 2 million lives of men, women, and children who died during the Khmer Rouge rule. All the pain and suffering they all had to go through and what they had to do in order to survive. What’s left is what remains, along with the stories from our own parents and family.

Forever engraved in our minds and hearts.

"Anniversary of Genocide" (speakers are French but there are subtitles)

On this day, many lives were changed.. and not for the better.

Anonymous asked: Hi :). I was just wondering if any of your followers had family that stayed at the Khao I Dang or Chonburi refugee camp in Thailand during the early 80's. My parents have been trying to track down some of their lost family / friends that lived in the camp with them and it would be nice to see them reconnect with their old friends again. If any of your followers feel okay with sharing their family's old refugee camp pics on here then that would be great.

Hi! and sure no problem! :)

ANY FOLLWERS HAVE ANY RELATIVES THAT STAYED AT “KHAO I DANG” or “CHONBURI” REFUGEE CAMP IN THAILAND!?

What’s YOUR family’s story?

I had a small talk with my cousin earlier asking me about our family history and how there is a type of chinese within our family’s bloodline. What are your experiences or experiences your family went through and where they are today?

Share them with us! :)

Pol Pot: Inside Evil (Part One)

"Nearly 2 million people died in the killing fields of Cambodia. A quarter of the country’s population lost in less than 4 years. one man above all was responsible for this secret genocide. He used hunger and terror to control not just what his people did and said, but what they wore, where they lived, and even who they loved. This is the story of Pol Pol’s journey to the Killing Fields.”

Cambodia: The Way to Year Zero (Part 1 of 3)

Pol Pot's Litte Red Book: The sayings of Angkar ›

Khmer Rouge Cambodia is a case in point. This is what makes Henri Locard’s Pol Pot’s Little Red Book such a valuable contribution to the study of Cambodian history, and to the study of genocide in general. Locard examines an extensive collection of commonly repeated sayings from the Pol Pot time, and the picture they paint is chilling. The regime’s mindset was a volatile mixture of cruelty, cunning, and unyielding extremism: a government of sociopaths, with no concern for the welfare of its own citizenry. Few phrases illustrate this more vividly than the most widely-known Khmer Rouge saying:

No gain in keeping, no loss in weeding out. (p. 210)

This adage was often expressed even more bluntly: To destroy you is no loss, to preserve you is no gain.


(for those who like to read, or who might be interested in this. and something that the @Khmerbooksarchive might have as well :)

S21: The Khmer Rouge Killing Machine (Documentary Film — Part 1)

"My son stayed home. He never behaved badly, never insulted elders. But they indoctrinated him, turned him into a thug who killed people. I brought my son up properly. When I think of the Khmer Rouge, who killed without flinching… what cruelty.”

 
1 2 3